Passion - The Flame That Should Burn Inside of You (Volume 3 of The Lies We Tell Ourselves)

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  1. Letter from a Region in My Mind
  2. Warning: Solo Travel Makes You Undateable
  3. Site Index
  4. Manual Passion - The Flame That Should Burn Inside of You (Volume 3 of The Lies We Tell Ourselves)

Print Culture History in Modern America. Peet, Lisa. Pevsner, Nikolaus. A History of Building Types. Pitcavage, Mark. Rosen, Ellen. Rubin, Richard E. Foundations of Library and Information Science. Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc, Scholes, Jefferey. Schlesselman-Tarango, Gina.

This is really what I needed to read today.

Letter from a Region in My Mind

Thank you for writing what I have struggled with mentally and emotionally for the last few months in particular. This is a terrific article! Thank you for it. If you recognize institutional racism and oppression in librarianship, you must think all white librarians are racists. I believe that we can care our work without deifying it.

We can do good work without being martyrs and losing sight of own needs. I think our profession will be better for it. I think some people respond to critiques of whiteness in librarianship as if they are being accused specifically of being racists and shut down.

Warning: Solo Travel Makes You Undateable

Too often, people respond to critiques of whiteness in American institutions by saying that the author must think all librarians are racists. They are missing the point. You might be interested in Roithmayr, R. Reproducing racism: How everyday choices lock in white advantage. While we did cover lots of issues surrounding equity and freedom of access i.

Even with that disinclination, I still feel the pressure to try to live up to that whole-self librarianship. Pingback : An introduction! Vocational awe. Thank you so much for all the work you do; I could never do that! Please pay me enough to pay my mortgage and my student loans.

I was a brand new Librarian! I was at NASA! And there were days that I could get fully caught up in the best of that awe. Other times, it was a job. And then… there were times it was really bad. Managing decisions by the contracting company I actually worked for which I considered harmful. Harmful decisions by people in the admin over on the NASA side. Physical harm caused to a coworker which occurred because of some of those decisions and which caused me and others emotional harm because a we cared for her and her injury was potentially life-threatening she recovered fairly quickly, but it was scary at first and b we realized our own safety did not matter to the people in charge.


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I was a Librarian. I was at NASA. I told him I threw up on my walk to work and I cried at night and I wanted to find a new job and… his face… I mean he was completely supportive. These were all things I feared at the time and I guess…years later… I still do. Pingback : New ish year, new ish editor! SNAP Section.

Not to be pedantic, but St. Lawrence is the patron saint of archivists, and St. Jerome or St. Catherine the patron saint s of librarians. Also, St. Secular authorities thought of gold and silver; St. Lawrence brought in the poor and destitute. I was looking around the Internet to see if Saint Lawrence really was the patron saint of librarians and archivists, and the only site that listed us as part of his patronage was Wikipedia.

Other sites mentioned Saint Jerome and Catherine of Alexandria. Pingback : Application essays and congruence — Gavia Libraria. Thank you for articulating this! To offer such a thoughtful critique gives space and pause to reflect and realize just how much a lack of critique can actually harm our professional stance. As an academic librarian and a practicing psychotherapist, I notice how our profession, as you have revealed as well, struggles greatly with boundaries, i. An excellent plumber is infinitely more admirable than an incompetent philosopher.

The society which scorns excellence in plumbing because plumbing is a humble activity, and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is an exalted activity, will have neither good plumbing nor good philosophy.

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Neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water. Excellence: Can we be equal and excellent too? New York: Norton. I think this is an incredibly important piece, but I encourage taking it in a different direction. I work at perhaps the apex of vocational awe in librarianship: I am a theological librarian. As a cis-hetero-white male, you might argue that I suffer less from that complex than others might.

Yet despite my privileged status, I still struggle with very human realities and have experienced various work settings both inside and outside of libraries. In my own religious tradition, Christianity, the goodness and sacredness of a group of people is precisely what allows it to come in for critique. Jesus held his followers to an even higher standard of critique than what was common in his Jewish society.

This includes issues of economics and work-life balance. My institution also cares about breaks, sick and vacation time, time for family and church involvement and recreation, etc. These are not merely calculated approaches to retaining talent, but a kind of sacred obligation.

I am very conscious of ways my organization continues to fall short. I too go home tired at the end of the day, and sometimes the bills feel impossible.

Manual Passion - The Flame That Should Burn Inside of You (Volume 3 of The Lies We Tell Ourselves)

I would encourage librarians in libraries of all sorts to fully embrace the awe connected to our vocation, and to make the logical connection that the sacredness of what we do requires valuing and protecting the lives of the people who do this work. This includes part-time workers and folks without a library degree. A martyr continues to express their sacred calling even in the face of oppression and ultimately death, exposing the violence of the system that does not recognize their value.

I hope and pray for more recognition of the sacredness of library work and less martyrdom. I then understand that the awe is an individual bestowal, not one that I can apply to the profession as a whole. Also, it is not the individual librarian who make this vast amount of resources available. It is usually the taxpayer or generous donors who should be thought of in awe for their generosity. I really, really regret wasting my time and money on a useless MLIS degree.

I should have taken a 2 year paramedic certification course at the Junior College. Then my services would be in demand! Well said and summarized. Not only applicable to librarianship but many positions in the paid and unpaid sectors. Linked to this on my FB page. Thank you!

The biggest lies we tell ourselves all start with "tomorrow"

In many ways I feel I just went to finishing school instead of graduate school. Wondering if times have changed? I totally agree with you on this. At lot of what library school is theory and developing professional skills. While I have learned things and have applied them to my work, the vast majority of learning is going to be experience.